Are There Any Laws Protecting Salaried Employees?

When can you not pay an exempt employee?

If an employee is available and ready to work, an employer may not dock an exempt employee’s pay unless no work is available for a full workweek.

No pay deductions are allowed due to the quality of work..

Is salaried better than hourly?

There is no right or wrong answer when determining whether your employees should be salaried or hourly. The main difference is that you’ll offer salaried workers an annual pay that will be consistently paid throughout the year. Conversely, an hourly worker is only paid for the hours they work.

Do exempt employees have to work 8 hours a day?

Most employers expect their exempt employees to work the number of hours necessary to get their jobs done. It doesn’t matter if that takes more or fewer than 40 hours per week. Even if your exempt employee works 70 hours in a week, you are still only required to pay them their standard base salary.

Do you have to pay a salaried employee if they do not work?

Salaried employees don’t need to be paid for full workweeks in which they perform no work. Partial day absences may only be deducted from an employee’s sick or vacation “bank”. … Full day absences for personal reasons may be deducted from an exempt employee’s salary if there is no vacation time in their time-off “bank”.

Can you legally deduct pay from a salaried employee?

Deductions from pay are permissible when an exempt employee: is absent from work for one or more full days for personal reasons other than sickness or disability; for absences of one or more full days due to sickness or disability if the deduction is made in accordance with a bona fide plan, policy or practice of …

How does PTO work when you are salaried?

It’s called Paid Time Off (PTO) because the employee is paid for the time that they’ve taken off. You can deduct 8 hours from their PTO balance, but the total pay remains the same. … Only specific situations will allow you to dock a salaried employee’s pay for taking hours or even a partial work week off.

Can a salaried employee take a day off without pay?

However, salaried employees are paid an annual wage regardless of the hours worked. … Regardless of the reason for the absence, you cannot reduce a salaried employee’s wage as the result of that employee taking a day off work. However, you can require non-exempt hourly employees to take unpaid time off.

When can an employee be salaried?

Salaried Employees To meet the FLSA salary test, an employee must earn at least $455 a week to be considered a salaried employee.

Can an employee be exempt and hourly?

You Can Pay Exempt Employees Their Guaranteed Salaries on an Hourly, Daily, or Shift Basis, and the Department of Labor Has Given Some Tips on How to Do It Correctly. … Such additional compensation may be paid on any basis – such as flat sum, bonus payment, straight-time hourly amount, or even time-and-a-half.

What are the guidelines for a salaried employee?

Minimum Salary Requirements The minimum compensation for a salary basis employee is $455 per week. If you pay any of your salaried employees on a salary or fee basis, the amount has to equal or exceed $455 per week. The minimum weekly salary for your computer-related salaried employee is also $455 per week.

What is the benefit of being salaried?

Salaried employees enjoy the security of steady paychecks, and they tend to pull in higher overall income than hourly workers. And they typically have greater access to benefits packages, bonuses, and paid vacation time.

What does it mean to be salaried exempt?

Exempt status is not determined by an employee’s job title or job description or by the fact that the employee is paid a salary. … Under state or local wage and hour law, employees who are exempt from the state or local minimum wage, overtime pay, or other wage and hour requirements.

Is it better to be an exempt or nonexempt employee?

Exempt Benefits: Flexibility Work Environment Because exempt employees are compensated for the jobs they do and not the time it takes them, they often have a more flexible work environment than non-exempt employees. … On the flip side, they are not paid overtime for any additional hours they may work to do their jobs.